Bitwise Operators

Four binary bitwise operators and one unary bitwise operator can be used in arithmetic expressions. They are represented by reserved words that must be preceded by a space and followed by a space.

Binary Bitwise Operators Meaning
B-AND The effect of performing a logical AND between the two data items
B-OR The effect of performing a logical OR between the two data items
B-XOR The effect of performing a logical XOR (exclusive OR) between the two data items
B-EXOR The effect of performing a logical XOR (exclusive OR) between the two data items
Unary Bitwise Operator Meaning
B-NOT The effect of performing a logical NOT on the data item

B-XOR and B-EXOR are equivalent.

These operators can only be used in any arithmetic expressions with COMP-5, COMP-X or numeric literal operands. B-NOT takes one operand. The rest take two operands. The result is as if the equivalent logical operator library routine were used on the operands and the result returned in a temporary data item the size of the largest item used. If the items differ in size then the smaller item is moved to a temporary data item of the same size as the larger item. If the operands are of mixed type (COMP-5, COMP-X) then the smaller operand is moved to a temporary item of the same type as the larger. For best performance use consistent data types.

Here is an example program:

data division.
working-storage section.
01 n1 pic 9(9).
 01 n2 pic xx comp-5.
 01 n3 pic xxxx comp-5.
 procedure division.
     move 2 to n2
     move 4 to n3
     compute n1 = n2 b-or n3        *> n1 = 6
     if n2 b-and n3 = n2
         display 'true'
     end-if
     compute n1 = b-not n2          *> n1 = 65533
     compute n1 = n2 b-xor n3 + 1   *> n1 = 7
     compute n1 = n2 b-and 2        *> n1 = 2